How to Convince Your Boss to Let You Work from Home

If you have always worked in the office, don’t assume that it is impossible to convince your manager that you should work remotely.

Using the information from Technology Advice’s infographic, you can effectively sell your manager on why you should be provided with the opportunity to work remotely.  When building your case for remote work, keep in mind 4 selling points to share with your manager.

1. Greater Productivity

How often are you distracted in the office environment?  Co-workers stopping by to say hello, getting trapped at the water cooler by a Chatty Cathy,  are just a couple of the many distractions that can occur in the office environment.

It’s obvious from the statistics listed in the infographic that office interactions as well as the commute can cause many distractions and higher levels of stress in employees.  When you limit these distractions, you have a greater chance at higher levels of productivity which is something that your manager will see as a benefit.

2. Cost Savings

Not only would working from home save you money, but it will also save your company money.  Simply reducing the stress of office politics and a hectic commute can save in health benefits costs.

A healthy employee is able to work more efficiently and work when needed versus a stressed out and sick employee who is quite often distracted or absent from work.

3. Use Past Examples

Perhaps you were permitted to work from home in the past due to inclement weather or some other situation.  If you were smart and used that opportunity wisely, you will be able to make use of the previous situation in order to prove your ability to work successfully outside of the office.

Remind your manager of when you worked remotely in the past.  Point out how productive you were by focusing on your accuracy and speed with completing your work.  If you were easily accessible via phone and email while working remotely, this will also help to build your case.

4. Suggest a Trial Period

Don’t be rigid in your request.  Consider suggesting a trial period of working remotely.  Your manager may feel more comfortable with a trial period and assessment afterwards.  Perhaps you work remotely for one month, providing weekly updates of your progress to your manager on projects.

At the end of the month, meet with your manager in the office to discuss the results.  If you were always accessible, completed your work accurately and in a timely manner, this is the time to point these things out.

Likely, your manager will have taken note of your performance during the trial period.  If there were no concerns or issues with your work, your manager may very well see the benefit of having you work remotely.